Enterprise 2019 Part 8

This is the first time I’ve felt like working on this ship in a few weeks. And, I don’t mean that in a “I just didn’t feel like it” sense, I mean I’ve literally been sick the past few weeks. Some kind of nasty flu, or something like that. I even had to call in to work a couple days, and I’m the type who almost never calls in.

Anyway, I’ve been working on the impulse engines:

I probably would have done more, but this is also the first time I’ve loaded up Windows in a few weeks. It told me along the way that it had downloaded an update. I opted to wait, but then decided to install the wretched thing a while later. It took almost an hour just to install this stupid update. I know how long it took because I was watching a stand up comedy special that was slightly over an hour. I started the update towards the beginning, and it finished just before the comedy special did. So, that was frustrating.

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Enterprise Test Renders 2

I fixed the issue with the window. I moved it forward so that it’s only intersecting two faces, instead of four. That’s what was causing the fuglies.

Eneterprise2019_WIP034

Also, here’s a good look at why I do the test renders, as opposed to just taking the 3D viewport’s word for it:

Screenshot (34)

You can see some of that stuff that was visible in the render with the window farther back in the 3D viewport, but it doesn’t show up in the higher quality render.

Enterprise Test Renders

This is why we do test renders.

I did some to test my window cuts in the teardrop. You can see some slight “pinching” around the round window in that last pic. This is caused by the angles of the faces and a few other things. I’ve got a plan to fix that, but if it doesn’t work I may just have to take that window out. Fortunately, I have an incremental save file with the unmarked teardrop, so I can just delete the window and then replace those faces, then try it again.

Enterprise 2019 Part 4

Work continues on the ship. I added the three cylindrical dudes that go behind the navigational deflector. Neither those nor the deflector itself will be getting changes from the canon model. I also added grid lines to the nacelles. I wasn’t sure at first if I wanted to add any there, but then I realized that the nacelles would stand out if they didn’t have lines. Besides, it helps add some visual appeal to what are basically long tubes without going gung ho and adding a bunch of stuff that doesn’t need to be there.

Anyway, I did some renders to see how it all looks, and because it was time to get something to eat anyway.

Enterprise 2019 Part 3

It’s interesting how you can look at pictures of something you’ve studied at length and notice new things. For example, I never noticed until a while ago that the round windows on the Enterprise are smaller than the rectangular ones. Obviously, they’re not as long because they’re circles, but they’re not even as tall.

Anywho, work continues on the ship. Grid lines, windows, grills, and other assorted doodads.

Enterprise 2019 Part 2

Just a quick update, plus I wanted to do some full renders to look at some of the materials, particularly the bussard collector domes. I finished up the main part of the nacelle end caps. People who know the ship will note that I broke from canon here. Don’t worry, there will be other canon breaks because I’m not building the canon ship. I’m also obviously not completely changing the design. I also added some more details to the nacelles, including pendants, which I also did on the secondary hull. It’s necessary to get all these details in there so that I can plot out where the grid lines will go. (yes, you read that correctly) And, I played around with some colors. I don’t remember which kit it was, but I remember one of the Enterprise model kits wanting you to paint the ship gull gray, so that’s what I went with. This will be the base color for the hull of the ship. I did a darker shade for some of the stuff, American Flag red for the pendants and amber for the little boomerang things. The bussard collectors are a color called outrageous orange. And, of course, aluminum for the gill looking things on the nacelles and copper for the deflector housing inside.