24th Century Cruiser Part 01

So, it’s that time again. I’ve started another ship. Hopefully, I’ll actually finish this one, as I have a bad habit lately of starting and not finishing things. Though, I’ve switched to Blender, so anything I was working on in Lightwave, including that Enterprise model, won’t be finished. That’s just how these things go. I’ve fought with getting Lightwave to work with Linux, but it just won’t. The license won’t install correctly. I found out on their forums that it has to do with the fact that there’s no Windows firewall. Lightwave 2018 uses a network render service by default. Even if you don’t use this feature, you can’t install the license without the firewall activated. But, such is life.

So, moving on. I had the urge to do something from the 24th century. I decided to do a cruiser, the same overall design and layout of the Constitution class, in fact it’s even about the same size as a Connie refit. Design elements are a blend of Connie-R, Excelsior and Ambassador. By 24th century standards, this would be a smaller cruiser, when stacked up against the Excelsior and Ambassador.

Most of the main elements are at least started. There’s more work to be done, of course, but the overall layout is there. There’s been a lot of pushing vertices and subdividing to get to this part. Everything is box modeled, as messing with splines is a pill.

Anyway, more to come on this (hopefully.)

Rebuilding, Part Two

So, I went in to work for some approved overtime a couple weeks ago, and that extra time was reflected on my most recent paycheck. That plus price drops on Amazon meant it was PC building time. So, I ordered a new motherboard, processor and RAM yesterday, to rebuild the CyberPowerPC gaming computer that I bought a little over a year ago. The fact that major components started failing a little over a year after purchase has made me start nicknaming this computer “Buyer’s Remorse.”

I’m not entirely certain what’s going bad, either the motherboard, processor or RAM. I didn’t feel like trying to test them, so I just replaced them. This is what was in the computer when I bought it:

-MSI B250M Bazooka motherboard: LGA 1151 socket, DDR4 RAM slots, and other stuff (do a web search if you’re interested in the stats.)
-Intel i5-7400: 3.0 GHz quad core
-8GB DDR4
-1TB HDD
-MSI AMD Radeon RX580 graphics card (4GB VRAM)
-Windows 10 Home

From the start, the computer was a dream. It gamed so nicely. That RX580 could play Final Fantasy 15 on nice settings out of the box, and other notoriously “heavy” games like Arkham Knight and Ark: Survival Evolved ran nicely too. When I went to dual boot Windows and Linux, I ran into issues with the RX580. AMD doesn’t do proprietary Linux drivers anymore, and I had screen flickering with the “Pro” open source driver. So, I swapped the card for my EVGA Nvidia GTX950, which runs great in both Windows and Linux.

Well, more recently, the computer has started not booting correctly. It wouldn’t post the first time every time, leading me to come to the conclusion that one of the main components was going out, either the motherboard, processor or RAM. So, I decided to replace those components. Here’s what I got from UPS today:

-MSI B450-A Pro motherboard: AM4, DDR4, etc.
-AMD Ryzen 5 2600: 3.4 GHz base clock, 6 cores, 12 threads
-16GB (2x 8GB) DDR4 2133 MHz Corsair Vengeance RAM

The whole setup cost me less than $371, after tax and wth Prime shipping. Here’s a pic of my initial planned build:

IMG_20190503_170002453

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